Tag Archives: Handel

Thine be the Glory!

The tune of Thine Be the Glory was written by Handel in 1747, intended for use in Handel’s Joshua oratorio however when it was played, it was popular enough that Handel added it to Judas Maccabaeus.

In 1884, Edmond L. Bundry used Handel’s tune and wrote words for them, which he titled “A Toi la Gloire.” It is reported that he was inspired to write it after the death of his first wife, Marie de Vayenborg in Lausanne, Switzerland. It was later published in French hymn book, Chants Evangéliques.

The hymn was first translated from French into English by Richard B. Hoyle in 1923.[1] He was commissioned to translate the hymn by the World Student Christian Federation after Bundy granted the W S C D permission  to reproduce it from the French version.

Original Lyrics
À toi la gloire, O Ressuscité!
À toi la victoire pour l’éternité!
Brillant de lumière, l’ange est descendu,
Il roule la Pierre du tombeau vaincu.
À toi la gloire, O Ressuscité!
À toi la victoire pour l’éternité!Vois-le paraître: C’est lui, c’est Jésus,
Ton Sauveur, ton Maître, Oh! ne doute plus!
Sois dans l’allégresse, peuple du Seigneur,
Et redis sans cesse: Le Christ est vainqueur!
À toi la gloire, O Ressuscité!Craindrais-je encore? Il vit à jamais,
Celui que j’adore, le Prince de paix;
Il est ma victoire, mon puissant soutien,
Ma vie et ma gloire : non, je ne crains rien!
À toi la gloire, O Ressuscité!
À toi la victoire pour l’éternité!

À toi la victoire pour l’éternité!Craindrais-je encore? Il vit à jamais,
Celui que j’adore, le Prince de paix;
Il est ma victoire, mon puissant soutien,
Ma vie et ma gloire : non, je ne crains rien!
À toi la gloire, O Ressuscité!
À toi la victoire pour l’éternité!

 

Thine [be] the glory, Oh resurrected One!
Thine [be] the victory, for eternity!
Shining with light, the angel descended,
He rolled the stone from the conquered grave.
Thine [be] the glory, Oh resurrected One!
Thine [be] the victory, for eternity!

Watch Him coming, it’s Him, it’s Jesus,
Your Saviour, your Master, Oh, doubt no more!
Rejoice, people of the Lord,
And repeat without ending: Christ is Conqueror!
Thine [be] the glory, Oh resurrected One!
Thine [be] the victory, for eternity!

Shall I still fear? He lives forever,
It is Him whom I adore, the Prince of peace;
He is my Victory, my mighty Reliance
my Life and my Glory: no, I fear nothing!
Thine [be] the glory, Oh resurrected One!
Thine [be] the victory, for eternity!

 

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April 20, 2014 · 07:46

George Frederick Handel

Born in Germany in 1685, George Frederick Handel moved to England in 1712

His various compositions were successful but eventually financial failure threatened to overwhelm him, and his relentless attempts to keep solvent had an adverse affect on his health. By 1741 it seemed certain he would land in debtors’ prison.

Yet that very year became the turning point for him when his close friend, Charles Jennens, gave him a libretto for a sacred work. It was essentially 73 Bible verses focusing on the prophecies concerning, and the coming of, the Messiah, Jesus Christ, both from the Old and New Testaments.

A charity in Dublin paid him to write something for a money-raising performance, and for 24 days Handel barely ate as he worked almost constantly composing. In fact he told a friend he could barely keep up with the notation as the melodies and ideas flowed from within, directly from God Himself! At one point, the composer had tears in his eyes and cried out to his servant, “I did think I did see all Heaven before me, and the great God Himself!” He had just finished writing the “Hallelujah” chorus.

Every word was from the Bible, 42 verses from the Old Testament and 31 from the New Testament. The “Messiah” was first performed in Dublin on April 13, 1742, to great acclaim.   It was so successful, it’s said that it’s proceeds freed 142 men from debtors’ prison!

Someone has said that Handel was a relentless optimist whose faith in God sustained him through every difficulty.

To God alone be the glory!

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