Tag Archives: help

Appearances, appearances

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May 12, 2014 · 17:17

Good Samaritan bus driver goes beyond call of duty (from the Edinburgh Evening News, 12,9, 2013)

    Neil Reid has helped injured, distressed and disorientated members of the public while on duty. Picture: Ian Rutherford

Neil Reid has helped injured, distressed and disorientated members of the public while on duty. Picture: Ian Rutherford

  • by David O’Leary

Published on the 12 September 2013 12:00    

BY night he’s a mild mannered dad of three but by day he’s a hero bus driver, ready to leap from his cab to help the injured and distressed. And his services are in high demand.

Good Samaritan, Neil Reid, 38, from  Gilmerton, has swung into action an incredible five times in the space of just ten months, leaving his bus mid-journey to deal with a variety of dramas.

The Lothian Buses driver has given aid to both the victim of a pub brawl and a traffic accident, was the first on the scene of an attempted suicide, helped a disorientated woman back to her home and most recently helped find a missing man before he had even been reported missing.

Depot bosses believe “super Neil” should be singled out for some sort of award, but the worker insists he’s just doing his job. He said: “I don’t think of what I did in any of these situations to be special, it’s my job to look after my passengers and members of the public.”

Neil’s sixth sense for city residents in need first kicked in on Leith Walk last November, when he saw a man assaulted outside a bar.

He immediately stopped his bus, rounded up two first aiders from his passengers and jumped out to tend the bloodied man ahead of the arrival of paramedics.

Just months later in January, he was on hand again to help a passenger who was knocked down by a taxi while crossing Waverley Bridge. Neil wrapped the young girl, who had suffered a broken leg, in his jacket and called for an ambulance.

In June he witnessed an incident which will “live with him the rest of his days”  after he spotted a man falling backwards over the Dean Bridge.

Neil jumped from his bus and using only the light from his mobile raced to find him in dense undergrowth 30 feet below. He soon found the man “unconscious, but breathing hard” and with severe injuries to his face.

Again in June, he helped a disorientated woman who boarded his bus and phoned his depot to arrange for a 
colleague to bring her home.

And on Wednesday last week, he noted an elderly passenger in Colinton who seemed “out of sorts”. Alarmed by the man’s agitated state, he phoned his controller and asked for the police to be informed. Minutes later he was told the man’s distressed wife had just filed a missing persons report to try and find the gentleman.

The modest hero said: “I’d like to think if one of my daughters was hurt or in distress that somebody would stop and help. Every day bus drivers help out in similar situations, it’s just that all of mine have been clumped together over the last ten months.”

Ian Craig, CEO of Lothian Buses, hailed the hard-working driver. He said: “I’m continually delighted when I hear stories about drivers going above and beyond the call of duty to help out members of the public. However, what Neil has done over the past year is truly exceptional. We’re very proud to call him a Lothian Buses employee.”

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Priorities

Brandon, MS Church Tries to Build 110 Foot Cross.

Posted on September 5, 2013

There’s a church in Brandon, MS that is trying to build a 110 foot cross because Christians always have such good luck with giant statues.  The project, sponsored by Crosses Across America was recently submitted to the Brandon city council for a zoning permit but was denied even though the church assured the cross could protect the town against 500ft tall vampires.  The church is currently trying to overturn the decision via online petition and facebook group, the two most effective forms of protest.

While I certainly have nothing against a 110 foot cross, I think these people could really spend their time, energy and most importantly money on better pursuits.  I haven’t been to church in quite some time but if I remember right, Jesus’ message was more focused on “help poor people” and less on “BUILD ME THE TALLEST, GAUDIEST MONUMENTS YOU CAN THINK OF”.  This single 110 foot cross will cost somewhere between $80,000-$100,000.  Instead of using the money to build something that does nothing for poor people, why don’t you follow Christ’s example and use that money to –

Feed 12 villages of 100 people for a year through Feed My Starving Children

Build an entire home with Habitat for Humanity with 40,000 left over.

buy 200 cows or 833 sheep for struggling farmers through get clean irrigation systems for several villages in India through Charity Water.

Buy 100,000 McDoubles and give them to hungry people!  Buy 10,000 hungry people appetizers at Red Lobster!  Take 1,000 homeless people out for dinner at a really fancy steakhouse!  Anything except building a stupid cross that does nothing to spread Christ’s message.

I guess it could provide shade for some homeless people on hot days.

 

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Bakers Anonymous

  • Somewhere in West Tennessee, not far from Graceland, nine women — or “The 9 Nanas,” as they prefer to be called — gather in the darkness of night. At 4am they begin their daily routine — a ritual that no one, not even their husbands, knew about for 30 years. They have one mission and one mission only: to create happiness. And it all begins with baked goods.
    “One of us starts sifting the flour and another washing the eggs,” explained Nana Mary Ellen, the appointed spokesperson for their secret society. “And someone else makes sure the pans are all ready. We switch off, depending on what we feel like doing that day.
    “But you make sure to say Nana Pearl is in charge, because she’s the oldest!” she added with a wink and a smile.
    Over the next three hours, The 9 Nanas (who all consider themselves sisters, despite what some of their birth certificates say) will whip up hundreds of pound cakes, as part of a grand scheme to help those in need. And then, before anyone gets as much as a glimpse of them, they’ll disappear back into their daily lives. The only hint that may remain is the heavenly scent of vanilla, lemon and lime, lingering in the air.
    Even the UPS driver, who picks up hundreds of packages at a time, has no clue what these women, who range in age from 54 to 72, are doing. He’s just happy to get a hug and a bag filled with special treats. What he doesn’t know is that he’s part of their master plan. A plan that began 35 years ago — when the “sisters” got together for their weekly card game — something their husbands referred to as “Broads and Bridge.”
    “Pearl says it was all her idea,” Mary Ellen teased, “but as I remember it, we were sitting around reminiscing about MaMaw and PaPaw and all the different ways they would lend a hand in the community.” MaMaw and PaPaw are the grandparents who raised four of the women, Mary Ellen included, when their mother passed away; and they took in Pearl as their own, when her parents needed some help.
    “MaMaw Ruth would read in the paper that someone had died,” Mary Ellen remembered, “and she’d send off one of her special pound cakes. She didn’t have to know the family. She just wanted to put a little smile on their faces. And we started thinking about what we could do to make a difference like that. What if we had a million dollars? How would we spend it?
    So the ladies began brainstorming.
    “One of the sisters suggested that we should all start doing our own laundry and put the money we saved to good use. I admit, I protested at first. There’s just something about laundering that I don’t like. But I was outnumbered! So among the nine of us, we’d put aside about $400 a month and our husbands never noticed a thing. Their shirts looked just fine.”
    And then the women started listening. They’d eavesdrop — all with good intentions, of course — at the local beauty shop or when they were picking up groceries. And when they heard about a widow or a single mom who needed a little help, they’d step in and anonymously pay a utility bill or buy some new clothes for the children.
    “We wanted to help as much as we could,” Mary Ellen said, “without taking away from our own families, so we became coupon clippers. And we’d use green stamps. Remember those? We’d use green stamps and we’d make sure to go to Goldsmith’s department store on Wednesdays. Every week they’d have a big sale and you could spend $100 and walk away with $700 worth of merchandise.”
    The Nanas would find out where the person lived and send a package with a note that simply said, “Somebody loves you” — and they’d be sure to include one of MaMaw Ruth’s special pound cakes.
    The more people they helped, the bolder they became.
    “We gave new meaning to the term drive-by,” Mary Ellen said with delight. “We’d drive through low-income neighbourhoods and look for homes that had fans in the window. That told us that the people who lived there didn’t have air-conditioning. Or we’d see that there were no lights on at night, which meant there was a good chance their utilities had been turned off. Then we’d return before the sun came up, like cat burglars, and drop off a little care package.”
    For three decades, the ladies’ good deeds went undetected — that is, until five years ago, when Mary Ellen’s husband, whom she lovingly calls “Southern Charmer,” started noticing extra mileage on the car and large amounts of cash being withdrawn from their savings account.
    “He brought out bank statements and they were highlighted!” Mary Ellen said, recalling the horror she felt. “I tried to explain that I had bought some things, but he had this look on his face that I’d never seen before — and I realized what he must have been thinking. I called the sisters and said, ‘You all need to get over here right away.’”
    So 30 years into their secret mission, the 9 Nanas and their husbands gathered in Mary Ellen’s living room and the sisters came clean. They told the husbands about the laundry and the eavesdropping — even the drive-bys. And that’s where their story gets even better — because the husbands offered to help.
    “They were amazed that we were doing this and even more amazed that they never knew. We can keep a good secret! All but three of them are retired now, so sometimes they come with us on our drive-bys. In our area, all you need is an address to pay someone’s utility bill, so we keep the men busy jotting down numbers.”
    It wasn’t long before the couples decided it was also time to tell their grown children. And that’s when happiness began to happen in an even bigger way. The children encouraged their mothers to start selling MaMaw Ruth’s pound cakes online, so they could raise money to help even more people. And it wasn’t long before they were receiving more than 100 orders in a day.
    “The first time we saw those orders roll in, we were jumping up and down,” Mary Ellen said with a laugh. “We were so excited that we did a ring-around-the-rosie! Then we called all the children and said, ‘What do we do next?'”
    That’s when the 9 Nanas moved their covert baking operation out of their homes and into the commercial kitchen of a restaurant owned by one of their sons, where they can sneak in before sunrise and sneak out before the staff comes in. They even hired a “happiness coordinator” (whose code name is “Sunny,” of course). Her identity needs to be a secret, too, so she can help out with the eavesdropping.
    “We swore her to secrecy — her parents think she works in marketing. And, really, if you think about it, she is doing public relations and spends a lot of time looking for people to help at the supermarket!”
    These days, The 9 Nanas are able to take on even bigger projects, given their online success. Recently they donated more than $5,000 of pillows and linens and personal care products to a shelter for survivors of domestic violence. And this August, they’ll celebrate their second consecutive “Happiness Happens Month” by sending tokens of their appreciation to one person in every state who has made a difference in their own community.
    And that million dollars they once wished for? They’re almost there. In the last 35 years, the 9 Nanas have contributed nearly $900,000 of happiness to their local community.
    But that doesn’t mean they’re too busy to continue doing the little things that make life a bit happier. Sometimes they just pull out the phone book and send off pound cakes to complete strangers. And if the Nanas spot someone at the grocery store who appears to need a little help, it’s not unusual for them to start filling a stranger’s cart.
    “Not everyone is as lucky as we were to have MaMaw and PaPaw to take care of them, to fix all those things that are wrong.
    “So this is our way of giving back,” Mary Ellen said. “We want people to know that someone out there cares enough to do something. We want to make sure that happiness happens.”
    “it’s about more than just the coffee” Suspended Coffees
    Thanks to Erin Masterson Korbylo and dailygood.org for the story
    Somewhere in West Tennessee, not far from Graceland, nine women -- or "The 9 Nanas," as they prefer to be called -- gather in the darkness of night. At 4am they begin their daily routine -- a ritual that no one, not even their husbands, knew about for 30 years. They have one mission and one mission only: to create happiness. And it all begins with baked goods. “One of us starts sifting the flour and another washing the eggs,” explained Nana Mary Ellen, the appointed spokesperson for their secret society. “And someone else makes sure the pans are all ready. We switch off, depending on what we feel like doing that day. “But you make sure to say Nana Pearl is in charge, because she’s the oldest!” she added with a wink and a smile. Over the next three hours, The 9 Nanas (who all consider themselves sisters, despite what some of their birth certificates say) will whip up hundreds of pound cakes, as part of a grand scheme to help those in need. And then, before anyone gets as much as a glimpse of them, they’ll disappear back into their daily lives. The only hint that may remain is the heavenly scent of vanilla, lemon and lime, lingering in the air. Even the UPS driver, who picks up hundreds of packages at a time, has no clue what these women, who range in age from 54 to 72, are doing. He’s just happy to get a hug and a bag filled with special treats. What he doesn’t know is that he’s part of their master plan. A plan that began 35 years ago -- when the “sisters” got together for their weekly card game -- something their husbands referred to as “Broads and Bridge.” “Pearl says it was all her idea,” Mary Ellen teased, “but as I remember it, we were sitting around reminiscing about MaMaw and PaPaw and all the different ways they would lend a hand in the community.” MaMaw and PaPaw are the grandparents who raised four of the women, Mary Ellen included, when their mother passed away; and they took in Pearl as their own, when her parents needed some help. “MaMaw Ruth would read in the paper that someone had died,” Mary Ellen remembered, “and she’d send off one of her special pound cakes. She didn’t have to know the family. She just wanted to put a little smile on their faces. And we started thinking about what we could do to make a difference like that. What if we had a million dollars? How would we spend it? So the ladies began brainstorming. “One of the sisters suggested that we should all start doing our own laundry and put the money we saved to good use. I admit, I protested at first. There’s just something about laundering that I don’t like. But I was outnumbered! So among the nine of us, we’d put aside about $400 a month and our husbands never noticed a thing. Their shirts looked just fine.” And then the women started listening. They’d eavesdrop -- all with good intentions, of course -- at the local beauty shop or when they were picking up groceries. And when they heard about a widow or a single mom who needed a little help, they’d step in and anonymously pay a utility bill or buy some new clothes for the children. “We wanted to help as much as we could,” Mary Ellen said, “without taking away from our own families, so we became coupon clippers. And we’d use green stamps. Remember those? We’d use green stamps and we’d make sure to go to Goldsmith’s department store on Wednesdays. Every week they’d have a big sale and you could spend $100 and walk away with $700 worth of merchandise.” The Nanas would find out where the person lived and send a package with a note that simply said, “Somebody loves you” -- and they’d be sure to include one of MaMaw Ruth’s special pound cakes. The more people they helped, the bolder they became. “We gave new meaning to the term drive-by,” Mary Ellen said with delight. “We’d drive through low-income neighborhoods and look for homes that had fans in the window. That told us that the people who lived there didn’t have air-conditioning. Or we’d see that there were no lights on at night, which meant there was a good chance their utilities had been turned off. Then we’d return before the sun came up, like cat burglars, and drop off a little care package.” For three decades, the ladies’ good deeds went undetected -- that is, until five years ago, when Mary Ellen’s husband, whom she lovingly calls “Southern Charmer,” started noticing extra mileage on the car and large amounts of cash being withdrawn from their savings account. “He brought out bank statements and they were highlighted!” Mary Ellen said, recalling the horror she felt. “I tried to explain that I had bought some things, but he had this look on his face that I’d never seen before -- and I realized what he must have been thinking. I called the sisters and said, 'You all need to get over here right away.'” So 30 years into their secret mission, the 9 Nanas and their husbands gathered in Mary Ellen’s living room and the sisters came clean. They told the husbands about the laundry and the eavesdropping -- even the drive-bys. And that’s where their story gets even better -- because the husbands offered to help. “They were amazed that we were doing this and even more amazed that they never knew. We can keep a good secret! All but three of them are retired now, so sometimes they come with us on our drive-bys. In our area, all you need is an address to pay someone’s utility bill, so we keep the men busy jotting down numbers.” It wasn’t long before the couples decided it was also time to tell their grown children. And that’s when happiness began to happen in an even bigger way. The children encouraged their mothers to start selling MaMaw Ruth’s pound cakes online, so they could raise money to help even more people. And it wasn’t long before they were receiving more than 100 orders in a day. “The first time we saw those orders roll in, we were jumping up and down,” Mary Ellen said with a laugh. “We were so excited that we did a ring-around-the-rosie! Then we called all the children and said, 'What do we do next?'" That’s when the 9 Nanas moved their covert baking operation out of their homes and into the commercial kitchen of a restaurant owned by one of their sons, where they can sneak in before sunrise and sneak out before the staff comes in. They even hired a “happiness coordinator” (whose code name is “Sunny,” of course). Her identity needs to be a secret, too, so she can help out with the eavesdropping. “We swore her to secrecy -- her parents think she works in marketing. And, really, if you think about it, she is doing public relations and spends a lot of time looking for people to help at the supermarket!” These days, The 9 Nanas are able to take on even bigger projects, given their online success. Recently they donated more than $5,000 of pillows and linens and personal care products to a shelter for survivors of domestic violence. And this August, they’ll celebrate their second consecutive “Happiness Happens Month” by sending tokens of their appreciation to one person in every state who has made a difference in their own community. And that million dollars they once wished for? They’re almost there. In the last 35 years, the 9 Nanas have contributed nearly $900,000 of happiness to their local community. But that doesn’t mean they’re too busy to continue doing the little things that make life a bit happier. Sometimes they just pull out the phone book and send off pound cakes to complete strangers. And if the Nanas spot someone at the grocery store who appears to need a little help, it’s not unusual for them to start filling a stranger’s cart. “Not everyone is as lucky as we were to have MaMaw and PaPaw to take care of them, to fix all those things that are wrong. “So this is our way of giving back,” Mary Ellen said. “We want people to know that someone out there cares enough to do something. We want to make sure that happiness happens.” "it's about more than just the coffee" @[431946943566996:274:Suspended Coffees] Thanks to Erin Masterson Korbylo and dailygood.org for the story
    DOUGH!
    homer-doh

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atheists

atheists

funny how it was people of faith who started and operated hospitals, who were involved in setting up schools, cared for the poor and marginalised and so on …… and did so, not necessarily as “good works” but because they had compassion prompted by their faith

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June 4, 2013 · 18:18

The Cordiners

 

The Meenister’s Log

I got into a bit of trouble when I first went to Trinidad.   The Church Officer, Henry Cordiner, his wfe and family lived in a ramshackle lean-to “shed” at the side of Greyfriars Church.  It was a dump & I asked the Congregational Board either to improve their accommodation or find them somewhere better.

The reply that I got was that they were better than most, regarding housing.

So much for socialist principles in a far off land.   It was a culture thing……… of course

 

 

 

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