Tag Archives: men

The Christian Misogynist

High school brings in Christian misogynist to lecture students about dating, students shut him down

    High school brings in Christian misogynist to lecture students about dating, students shut him down
    Justin Lookadoo (Credit: via Lookadoo.com)
    Texas students didn’t take too kindly to a “dating expert” who believes “dateable girls know how to shut up”

    Justin Lookadoo is a Christian motivational speaker and “dating expert” who believes that “dateable girls know how to shut up,” and that “dateable guys … know they are stronger, more dangerous, and more adventurous [than girls] and that’s okay.”

    He also illustrates his advice:

    And puts his advice into pithy one-liners, telling girls that, “If you go too tight, too short, or too low-cut [with the clothes you wear], you are no longer a person to get to know but an object to use.”

    This is terrible advice that no one should listen to. And yet a high school in Texas actually invited Lookadoo to share his retrograde and deeply misogynistic Christian complementarian views with its students.

    But they weren’t having it. Students at Richardson High School swarmed Lookadoo after his talk to call him out for being a sexist jerk; they also took to Twitter to further ridicule him (and their school for inviting Lookadoo in the first place).

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    The Wedding Ring

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    August 23, 2013 · 18:14

    Women

    Equality

    Equality

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    Getting More Bums on Pews 2

    Getting More Bums on Pews 2

    getting more people to come to church – men, anyhow (this is sexist and non-pc)….. could this be the answer?!!!!!

     

    https://sandystrachan.wordpress.com/2013/05/04/bums-on-pews-c…e-the-guardian

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    May 4, 2013 · 08:14

    Why Men Have Stopped Singing In Church (from the blog – “Church for Men”)

    • Worship band in the dark

      It happened again yesterday. I attended one of those hip, contemporary churches — and almost no one sang. Worshippers stood obediently as the band rocked out, the smoke machine belched and lights flashed. Lyrics were projected on the screen, but almost no one sang them. A few women were trying, but I saw only one male (other than the worship leader) making the attempt.

      Last month I blogged, “Have Christians Stopped Singing?” I did some research, and learned that congregational singing has ebbed and flowed over the centuries. It reached a high tide when I was a young man – but that tide may be going out again. And that could be bad news for men.

      First, a very quick history of congregational singing.

      Before the Reformation, laypersons were not allowed to sing in church. Sacred music was performed by professionals (priests and cantors), played on complex instruments (pipe organs), and sung in an obscure language (Latin).

      Reformers gave worship back to the people, in the form of congregational singing. They composed simple tunes with lyrics that people could easily memorize. Some of the tunes came out of local taverns.

      A technological advance – the printing press – led to an explosion of congregational singing. The first hymnal was printed in 1532, and soon a few dozen hymns became standards across Christendom. Hymnals slowly grew over the next four centuries. By the mid 20th century every Protestant church had a hymnal of about 1000 songs, 250 of which were regularly sung. In the church of my youth, everyone picked up a hymnal and sang every verse of every song.

      About a decade ago, a new technological advance – the computer controlled projection screen – entered America’s sanctuaries. Suddenly churches could project song lyrics for all to see. Hymnals became obsolete. No longer were Christians limited to 1,000 songs handed down by our elders.

      At first, churches simply projected the songs everyone knew – hymns and a few simple praise songs that had come out of the Jesus Movement. People sang robustly.

      But that began to change about three years ago. Worship leaders brought in new songs each week. They drew from the radio, the Internet, and Worship conferences. Some began composing their own songs, performing them during worship, and selling them on CD after church.

      Years ago, worship leaders used to prepare their flocks when introducing a new song. “We’re going to do a new song for you now. We’ll go through it twice, and then we invite you to join in.”

      That kind of coaching is rare today. Songs get switched out so frequently today that it’s impossible to learn them. People can’t sing songs they’ve never heard. And with no musical notes to follow, how is a person supposed to pick up the tune?

      And so the church has returned to the 14th century. Worshippers stand mute as professional-caliber musicians play complex instruments, and sing in an obscure language. Martin Luther is turning over in his grave.

      What does this mean for men? On the positive side, men no longer feel pressure to sing in church. Men who are poor readers or poor singers no longer have to fumble through hymnals, sing archaic lyrics or read a musical staff.

      But the negatives are huge. Men are doers, and singing was one of the things we used to do together in church. It was a chance to participate. Now, with congregational singing going away, and communion no longer a weekly ordinance, there’s only one avenue left for men to participate in the service – the offering. Is this really the message we want to send to men? Sit there, be quiet, and enjoy the show. And don’t forget to give us money.

      There’s nothing wrong with professionalism and quality in church music.The problem isn’t the rock band, or the lights, or the smoke machine. The key here is familiarity. When that super-hip band performed a hymn, the crowd responded. People sang. Even the men.

     

    Murrow also blogs:

    When I was a kid growing up in church, we sang hymns. Songs about God. From a book. Never more than three in a row. There was little emotion attached to this experience. Nobody dimmed the lights.

    • And we all sang. Loudly. Or at least we mouthed the words.

      Today, worship is not something you do – it’s something you feel. We no longer sing about God, we sing to him. There might be seven songs in a row without a break. We are expected to feel something. The lights are low.

      And we’re not singing any more.

      As I visit churches around the country, I’ve frequently observed that the majority of attendees do not sing. They stand motionless, looking at the words on the jumbo screen. It’s particularly noticeable in so called seeker-friendly congregations. I’d guess that only a quarter of the men sing.

      According to LifeWay Worship Director Mike Harland, the modern stage-driven worship atmosphere gives people an excuse to be spectators instead of participators.

      Lillian Kwon writes in the Christian Post, “While the congregation is left in the dark under dim lights, stage lights place the focus on the gifted worship leader — who has in-ear monitors and who sings songs in a key that best fits him or her. The worship leader can’t hear the congregation or see the congregation and ‘they don’t even know that the congregation is not even singing,’ Harland said.

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