Tag Archives: Noah

A search committee discusses possible applicants for a vacant Charge

Adam: Good man, but problems with his wife. Also, one reference told of how his wife and he enjoy walking naked in the garden.

Noah: Former pastorate of 120 years, with no converts. Prone to unrealistic building projects.

Moses: A modest and meek man, but poor communicator, even stuttering at times. Sometimes blows his stack and acts rashly. Some say he left an earlier position over a murder charge.

David: The most promising leader of all, until we discovered the affair he had with his neighbour’s wife.

Solomon: Great preacher, but our manse would never hold all those wives. 

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This is NOT satire….

Texas man’s discovery of Noah’s flood fossils in front yard ‘confirmed’ sight-unseen by biblical scholar
Tom Boggioni – “Raw Story”
18 MAR 2016 AT 16:34 ET
A Texas man who discovered what he believes to be prehistoric fossils in his aunt’s front yard has received confirmation from a self-described biblical scholar and fossil expert — although he has yet to see them, reports KYTX.

According to Wayne Propst, he was replacing soil in his aunt Sharon Givan’s yard when he made the amazing discovery of the fossilized snail shells which he believes date back to the time of Noah’s flood.
“What’s really interesting to me is we’re talking about the largest catastrophe known to man, the flood that engulfed the entire world,” Propst explained, while showing off fossilized remains and adding, “Noah’s flood in my front yard. How much better can it get?”

Seeking to verify the veracity of his claim, Propst contacted self-proclaimed fossil expert Joe Taylor who stated that the fossils indeed are a remnant of the Biblical flood that covered the Earth due to God’s wrath.

Although Taylor has yet to study the fossils — or even lay eyes on them in person — he believes that they are a sign of the flood in the dry East Texas town and called the discovery “rare.”

“I’ve never heard of anything about that from over there, I’m surprised he found it there,” Taylor explained.
According to Probst, he is maintaining the fossil dig with the help of neighborhood kids and his aunt Sharon who cleans each discovery with a toothbrush before they are photographed.

“Now all I got to do is go in front of my aunt’s house and pick up something from back when it all began. I don’t even have to search anymore,” said Probst, adding, ” Who else can say they have a front yard full of Noah’s dirt?”

Proust’s aunt Sharon agreed, saying: “To think that like he says that we have something in our yard that dated back to when God destroyed the earth. I mean, how much better could anything be?”

 

 

 

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No way, Noah

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August 24, 2015 · 10:03

Hope for all

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October 30, 2014 · 21:40

Noah

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October 6, 2014 · 11:31

Creation

 

Running about three and a half minutes, “Creation” unfolds as time-lapse CGI animation sequence that plays out a (mostly) scientifically-accurate version of The Big Bang, the formation of Earth and evolution of life from single-celled organisms to early sea creatures to all variety of Earthly animals as Crowe’s Noah recites a version of the Biblical “seven days” creation story – implying that one is metaphor for the other. Adam & Eve, The Serpent and Eden appear only at the end, looking more surreal and alien than almost anything else in the film.

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May 15, 2014 · 09:19

The Flood – part 2

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A screening of the film Noah was cancelled last week due to flooding in a cinema

In a case of ‘epic’ irony, cinemagoers were turned away from the first viewing of the biblical movie last Friday due to excess water found in Exeter Vue.

One tweeted: “#Irony. The day Noah was released Exeter Vue was flooded overnight.”

Staff discovered the low level flooding when they arrived for work just after 7am, the Exeter Express and Echo reports.

The venue closed to the public until 2pm, forcing the first showing of Noah at 12.15pm to be cancelled.

A spokesperson for Vue said: “We can confirm that there was flooding at Vue Exeter on Friday 4 April due to a fault with an ice machine.”

Noah, created by Oscar-winning director Darren Aronofsky, is set to become one of this season’s biggest blockbusters.

 

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Oh, Noah!

Huff Post : 03/22/2014

Darren Aronofsky’s upcoming Biblical drama “Noah” may be “the least biblical biblical film ever made,” as the director said, but it turns out quite a few Christian leaders enjoy the film in spite of that.

Cooke Pictures, a company that produces media programming for nonprofit and religious organizations, released a video on Friday showing Christian leaders reacting to “Noah.” Despite objections from some in the religious community saying the film took unwarranted creative license with the Bible story, not everyone is so critical.

Leaders from organizations like American Bible Society, National Catholic Register, The King’s College, Q Ideas, Hollywood Prayer Network, and Focus on the Family offer their opinions in the video — and, for the most part, they are glowing.

Here are some of the Christian leaders’ reactions:

“Darren Aronofsky is not a theologian, nor does he claim to be. He is a filmmaker and a storyteller, and in ‘Noah’, he has told a compelling story. It is a creative interpretation of the scriptural account that allows us to imagine the deep struggles Noah may have wrestled with as he answered God’s call on his life.” — Jim Daly, President, Focus on the Family

“‘Noah’ is big and bold and entertaining, and without a doubt pro-faith and pro-God.” — Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, President, National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference

“While ‘Noah’ makes no claims to be an inerrant retelling of the Scripture, it is a great tool to draw genuine intrigue in what the Bible does say. The film draws forward the themes of obedience and its consequences, sin and judgment, and mercy and justice, all in the context of the early interaction between God and man.” — Andrew Palau, Luis Palau Association

“‘Noah’ tells a wonderful story and still points us to major truths of God: the consequences of sin, a fallen mankind, divine justice and divine mercy. God will definitely use this film in our culture and it’s our choice as Christians to decide if we want to join in the conversation or not.” — Karen Covell, Founding Direction, Hollywood Prayer Network

“‘Noah’ is nothing short of astonishing. I am confident that it will be remembered as a film that helped re-enchant a new generation with the biblical narrative. Honestly, it is path-breaking.” — Greg Thornbury, President, The King’s College

Among those who will not be watching ‘Noah’, however, are Pope Francis and Glenn Beck. In a recent video Beck called the film “dangerous disinformation”, saying that, if allowed to watch it, children will believe the film’s Noah story over the Bible’s.

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Noah – No Way!

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Studio cut of Noah ‘featured religious montage and Christian rock song’ Paramount’s desperate efforts to market Darren Aronofsky’s biblical epic to Christians appear to have failed

Paramount Pictures Studio executives tested an alternate version of Darren Aronofsky’s forthcoming biblical epic Noah that opened with a montage of religious images and ended with a Christian rock song, it has been revealed.

More on this film Aronofsky said recently that he had won a battle with executives to screen his own version of Noah in cinemas after around half a dozen alternate cuts failed to find traction with evangelical filmgoers.

Now a new profile of the film-maker in The New Yorker details the desperate lengths to which Paramount went to court religious audiences in the US, who had earlier turned their noses up at a test screening of Aronofksy’s edit.  “In December, Paramount tested its fifth, and ‘least Aronofskian’, version of Noah: an 86-minute beatitude that began with a montage of religious imagery and ended with a Christian rock song,” reveals the profile.

Fortunately for cinemagoers, the new cut scored lower than Aronofsky’s own version had with Christian audiences. The New Yorker piece also reveals why executives felt they had to move forward with (now abandoned) alternate cuts in the first place: the Black Swan director, who gave up final cut on his film in exchange for a reported $160m (£96m) budget, was seemingly in no mood to compromise.  “Noah is the least biblical biblical film ever made,” Aronofsky is quoted as saying. “I don’t give a fuck about the test scores! My films are outside the scores. Ten men in a room trying to come up with their favourite ice cream are going to agree on vanilla. I’m the rocky road guy.”

The New Yorker piece suggests Noah is far from the successor to Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ, which took $611m worldwide in 2004 after evangelicals flocked to see it, that Paramount had apparently been hoping for. Aronofksy’s movie is said to feature a segment showing how Darwinian evolution transformed amoebas into apes, as well as what the director describes as “a huge [environmental] statement in the film … about the coming flood from global warming”.

Earlier reports suggested religious audiences at test screenings for Aronofsky’s cut disliked “dark” scenes in which Russell Crowe’s Noah gets drunk and ponders taking extreme measures to wipe mankind from the face of the Earth. Many complained that the film inaccurately represented the biblical story upon which it is based, despite the fact that a scene in which Noah has one too many after finding land with his ark does appear in the Bible.

Paramount now appears to have given up on its efforts to market Noah to Christians, with the studio issuing a statement last month making clear that the movie is not intended as a direct translation. It also looks likely to be banned across large swaths of the Middle East and parts of north Africa for contravening Islamic rules on the depiction of prophets.

© 2014 Guardian News and Media Limited

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March 17, 2014 · 11:20

Snail Away

Snail Away

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March 6, 2014 · 18:12