Tag Archives: Organist

Songs of Praise

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March 12, 2016 · 11:36

Once more unto the breach

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This reminds me of a wedding that I once conducted in one of my Parishes.  I had officiated at the bride’s previous marriage just a couple of years before – same church, same hymns, same guests on her side (different ones on his, of course).  I started by saying something like “A warm welcome to all of you to St. *******’s Church, and welcome (and I was just about to say “back again” to you, X……, and you, John, but managed not to, just)

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The Church Organist

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The Parish Organist

The Parish Organist

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April 11, 2014 · 12:40

A bit naughty

during the uplifting of the Offering, the Meenister went over to the organist and said, “you see Miss M. In the choir? I always thought that she was a natural blonde – but she’s wearing a very short skirt today and, well, you can see right up it and she’s obviously not!”

“Aye, she is a genuine blonde – these are a cluster of bluebottles you’re looking at!”

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You might be a preacher if……

You might be a preacher if… You`ve paddled at the seaside wearing a clerical collar.

You`ve ever dreamed you were preaching only to awaken and discover that you were.

You`d rather negotiate with terrorists than the church organist.

A Sunday School picnic is no picnic.

You`ve ever wanted to fire the church and form a congregation search committee.

You`ve ever wanted to lay hands on an Elder, and you weren’t thinking of praying for him.

You often feel like you`re herding cats rather than shepherding sheep.

Your sermons have a happy ending; everyone’s happy when it ends!

You`ve never preached on TV, but your wife made you get down before you break something.

BUT  It’s your job to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable

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Organ 2

A certain choir was rehearsing one of Stanford’s more difficult pieces when the choir director noiced a kerfuffle in the organ loft. He called up, “Mr. Y, is there a problem?” Came the peeved reply, “Yes! My pedal light is out!” Silence followed for a moment, then- “Mr. Y, Bach never had a pedal light!”

To which Mr. Y retorted, “Bach never had to play Stanford in G!”

Sir Charles Villiers Stanford was an Irish composer, music teacher, and conductor. Born to a well-off and highly musical family in Dublin, Stanford was educated at the University of Cambridge before studying music in Leipzig and Berlin. 

Born: September 30, 1852, Dublin
Died: March 29, 1924, London
Education: Queens’ College, Cambridge, Eton College
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The postman put some Scheidt through my letter box this morning

Samuel Scheidt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia

Samuel Scheidt (baptized 3 November 1587 – 24 March 1654) was a German composer, organist and teacher of the early Baroque era.

Scheidt was born in Halle, and after early studies there, he went to Amsterdam to study with Sweelinck, the distinguished Dutch composer, whose work had a clear influence on Scheidt’s style. On his return to Halle, Scheidt became court organist, and later Kapellmeister, to the Margrave of Brandenburg. Unlike many German musicians, for example Heinrich Schütz, he remained in Germany during the Thirty Years’ War, managing to survive by teaching and by taking a succession of smaller jobs until the restoration of stability allowed him to resume his post as Kapellmeister. When Samuel Scheidt lost his job because of Wallenstein, he was appointed in 1628 as musical director of three churches in Halle, including the Market Church.

Scheidt was the first internationally significant German composer for the organ, and represents the flowering of the new north German style, which occurred largely as a result of the Protestant Reformation. In south Germany and some other countries of Europe, the spiritual and artistic influence of Rome remained strong, so most music continued to be derivative of Italian models. Cut off from Rome, musicians in the newly Protestant areas readily developed styles that were much different from those of their neighbors.

Scheidt’s music is in two principal categories: instrumental music, including a large amount of keyboard music, mostly for organ; and sacred vocal music, some of which is a cappella and some of which uses a basso continuo or other instrumental accompaniment. In his numerous chorale preludes, Scheidt often used a “patterned variation” technique, in which each phrase of the chorale uses a different rhythmic motive, and each variation is more elaborate than the previous one, until the climax of the composition is reached. In addition to his chorale preludes, he wrote numerous fugues, suites of dances (which were often in a cyclic form, sharing a common ground bass) and fantasias.

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Organist

Organist

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June 11, 2013 · 07:42

Praise Band

Praise Band

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March 28, 2013 · 09:41