Tag Archives: rule of St Benedict

World’s longest-serving nun dies after spending dies, aged 105, after spending 86 years in cloisters

By  Tara Brady

PUBLISHED: 23:39, 12 June  2013 |  UPDATED: 08:11,  13 June 2013

A woman believed to be the world’s  longest-serving nun who spent 86 years  living in a monastery has died in Spain aged 105.

Sister Teresita Barajuen died last night  according to Sister Maria Romero, abbess of the Buenafuente del Sistal monastery  outside Madrid.

She entered the Cistercian monastery when she  was 19, according to the abbess.

 
Devoted: Sister Teresita Barajuen who has died in Spain at the age of 105

Devoted: Sister Teresita Barajuen who has died in Spain  at the age of 105

Sister Teresita acknowledged in interviews  that like many young women at the time, she never intended being a nun but  entered the monastery because of family pressure.

In 2011 she left the monastery for the first  time in 40 years to meet now-retired Benedict XVI during a papal visit to  Madrid.

 She entered the monastery on the same day he  was born.

The Order of Cistercians is a Roman Catholic  religious order of enclose monks and nuns.

 
Sister Teresita said she never intended to be a nun but entered the monastery because of family pressure

Sister Teresita said she never intended to be a nun but  entered the monastery because of family pressure

 
Sister Teresita met the now retired Pope Benedict XVI in 2011 when he visited Madrid

Sister Teresita met the now retired Pope Benedict XVI in  2011 when he visited Madrid 

Sister Teresita entered the monastery on the same day Pope Benedict (pictured) was born

Sister Teresita entered the monastery on the same day  Pope Benedict (pictured) was born

They are sometimes also called the  Bernardines or the White Monks, in reference to the colour of the habit over  which a black scapular is worn.

The emphasis of Cistercian life is on manual  labour and self-sufficiency. Many abbeys have traditionally supported themselves  through activities such as agriculture and brewing ales.

The term Cistercian is the Latin name for the  village of Cîteaux, near Dijon in eastern France.

It was in this village that a group of  Benedictine monks from the monastery of Molesme founded Cîteaux Abbey in 1098,  with the goal of following more closely the Rule of Saint Benedict. 

There has also always been a large number of  Cistercian nuns; the first community was founded in the Diocese of Langres in  1125.

 

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