Tag Archives: Spain

History of a property

One of the best examples of how ridiculous government paperwork can be is illustrated by a recent case in Louisiana. A company president was trying to buy some land in Louisiana for a plant expansion, and he wanted to finance this new facility with a government loan. 

His lawyer filled out all the necessary forms, including the abstract—tracing the title to the land back to 1803. The government reviewed his application and abstract and sent the following reply: 

‘We received today your letter enclosing application for your client supported by abstract of title. We have observed, however, that you have not traced the title previous to 1803, and before final approval, it will be necessary that the title be traced previous to that year. Yours truly.’ 

As a result, the lawyer sent the following letter to the government: 

‘Gentlemen, your letter regarding title received. I note you wish title to be claimed back further than I have done it. 

‘I was unaware that any educated man failed to know that Louisiana was purchased by the United States from France in 1803. The title of the land was acquired by France by right of conquest of Spain. The land came into possession of Spain in 1492 by right of discovery by a Spanish-Portugese sailor named Christopher Columbus, who had been granted the privilege of seeking a new route to India by Queen Isabella. 

‘The good queen, being a pious woman and careful about title, took the precaution of securing the blessing of the Pope of Rome upon Columbus’ voyage before she sold her jewels to help him. 

‘Now the Pope, as you know, is the emissary of Jesus Christ, who is the Son of God. And God made the world. Therefore, I believe it is safe to assume that He also made that part of the United States called Louisiana, and I now hope you’re satisfied.’ 

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World’s longest-serving nun dies after spending dies, aged 105, after spending 86 years in cloisters

By  Tara Brady

PUBLISHED: 23:39, 12 June  2013 |  UPDATED: 08:11,  13 June 2013

A woman believed to be the world’s  longest-serving nun who spent 86 years  living in a monastery has died in Spain aged 105.

Sister Teresita Barajuen died last night  according to Sister Maria Romero, abbess of the Buenafuente del Sistal monastery  outside Madrid.

She entered the Cistercian monastery when she  was 19, according to the abbess.

 
Devoted: Sister Teresita Barajuen who has died in Spain at the age of 105

Devoted: Sister Teresita Barajuen who has died in Spain  at the age of 105

Sister Teresita acknowledged in interviews  that like many young women at the time, she never intended being a nun but  entered the monastery because of family pressure.

In 2011 she left the monastery for the first  time in 40 years to meet now-retired Benedict XVI during a papal visit to  Madrid.

 She entered the monastery on the same day he  was born.

The Order of Cistercians is a Roman Catholic  religious order of enclose monks and nuns.

 
Sister Teresita said she never intended to be a nun but entered the monastery because of family pressure

Sister Teresita said she never intended to be a nun but  entered the monastery because of family pressure

 
Sister Teresita met the now retired Pope Benedict XVI in 2011 when he visited Madrid

Sister Teresita met the now retired Pope Benedict XVI in  2011 when he visited Madrid 

Sister Teresita entered the monastery on the same day Pope Benedict (pictured) was born

Sister Teresita entered the monastery on the same day  Pope Benedict (pictured) was born

They are sometimes also called the  Bernardines or the White Monks, in reference to the colour of the habit over  which a black scapular is worn.

The emphasis of Cistercian life is on manual  labour and self-sufficiency. Many abbeys have traditionally supported themselves  through activities such as agriculture and brewing ales.

The term Cistercian is the Latin name for the  village of Cîteaux, near Dijon in eastern France.

It was in this village that a group of  Benedictine monks from the monastery of Molesme founded Cîteaux Abbey in 1098,  with the goal of following more closely the Rule of Saint Benedict. 

There has also always been a large number of  Cistercian nuns; the first community was founded in the Diocese of Langres in  1125.

 

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Ecce Mono (Candle)

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 A combination of three documents provided by the Centre de Estudios Borjanos on Aug 22, 2012 shows the original version of the painting Ecce Homo, (left), by 19th-century painter Elias Garcia Martinez, the deteriorated version, (centre), and the restored version by an elderly woman in Spain. An elderly woman’s catastrophic attempt to “restore” a century-old oil painting of Christ in a Spanish church has provoked popular uproar, and amusement. — PHOTO: AFP

 A small Spanish town is trying to figure out what to do with a century-old painting of Christ that has been disfigured by a local artist who took it upon herself to restore it.

Juan Maria Ojeda, an official in Borja town, said 80-year-old Celia Gimenez decided to touch up the fresco of Christ wearing a crown of thorns in the Misericordia church because she thought it need restoration. He said no one realised how badly disfigured the painting was until she rang town hall to say what she had done.

The fate of the painting has made national news in Spain.

The fresco is of the genre known as “Ecce Homo” style (“Behold the Man”). But on Thursday some Twitter users were dubbing it “Ecce Mono” (“Behold the Monkey”)

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